ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting & ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting BLOG

BLOG about ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting, ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting and .NET 4.5 Framework and its Capabilities

Visual Studio 2010 Hosting :: Working with Visual Studio 2010 Parallels Stacks

clock September 30, 2010 04:35 by author Administrator

Parallel Stacks is one of the debugging enhancements in VS 2010 IDE that helps in debugging parallel programming. When you press F5 for debugging Parallel Stacks and Parallel Tasks windows get enabled in debug mode only. As you know, when a break point is set Program will stop at the Break Point

Debug Menu Item->Windows->Parallel Stacks



Parallel Stacks

The Parallel Stacks window demonstrates call stack information for all threads and Tasks



There is a dropdown list in the upper left-hand corner to select either Thread View or Task view



The below figure indicates parallel stacks in Tasks View



The below described are the other options

Show Only Flagged

There is Flagged Icon in the toolbar to show only call stacks for flagged threads. Flagging of the threads can be done from parallel tasks window

Toggle Method View

This help to toggle between Stack View and Method View

AutoScroll to current Stack Frame

As the name suggests this feature helps to auto-scroll the diagram to the current stack frame

Toggle Zoom Control

This feature is to show/hide the zoom control

Right click on the current thread in call stack window and you can see the options as shown below



We can Go to Source Code directly from here using Go to SourceCode Option. The other options are Go to Disassembly, Show External Code, Hexadecimal Display, Symbol Load Information, and Symbol Settings. The two new items that we get in addition to these are “Switch to Frame” and “Go to Task

“Switch to Frame” - switches to the frame that gets called in Call Stack window, but in a parallel application, there are cases that multiple frames may correspond to one method context. In that case there will be sub-menu items for each stack frame

“Go to Task”- switches to the Task view. We can also navigate the same using the dropdown list in the toolbar. But it keeps the stack frame that has clicked as highlighted



ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting :: ASP.NET GridView UI Tips and Tricks by using jQuery

clock September 27, 2010 14:52 by author Administrator

This article demonstrates how to create simple UI effects in an ASP.NET GridView control using jQuery. These tips have been tested in IE 7 and Firefox 3.

Set up an ASP.NET GridView as you usually do, binding it to a datasource. For demonstration purposes, here’s some sample markup where we are using the Northwind database and a GridView bound to the SQLDataSource to pull data from the database.

<form id="form1" runat="server">

<div>

    <asp:SqlDataSource ID="SqlDataSource1" runat="server" ConnectionString="<%$ ConnectionStrings:NorthwindConnectionString %>"

        SelectCommand="SELECT [CustomerID], [CompanyName], [ContactName], [Address], [City] FROM [Customers]">

    </asp:SqlDataSource>   

    <br />          

    <asp:GridView ID="GridView1" runat="server" AutoGenerateColumns="False" DataKeyNames="CustomerID"

        DataSourceID="SqlDataSource1" AllowPaging="False" AllowSorting="True" >

        <Columns>                          

            <asp:BoundField DataField="CustomerID" HeaderText="CustomerID" ReadOnly="True" SortExpression="CustomerID" />

            <asp:BoundField DataField="CompanyName" HeaderText="CompanyName" SortExpression="CompanyName" />

            <asp:BoundField DataField="ContactName" HeaderText="ContactName" SortExpression="ContactName" />

            <asp:BoundField DataField="Address" HeaderText="Address" SortExpression="Address" />

            <asp:BoundField DataField="City" HeaderText="City" SortExpression="City" />

        </Columns>

    </asp:GridView>

</div>

</form>

The <connectionStrings> element in the web.config will look similar to the following:

      <connectionStrings>

            <add name="NorthwindConnectionString" connectionString="Data Source=(local);Initial Catalog=Northwind;Integrated Security=True" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>

      </connectionStrings>

Note: In most of the tips shown here, we are using a complex jQuery row ‘filter’ suggested by Karl Swedberg to a user in a jQuery forum. This filter is required due to the fact that a GridView does not render (accessibility tags) a <thead> and a <tfoot> by default. For the header, the GridView generates <th>’s inside <tr>. Similarly for the footer, the GridView generates a <table> inside a <tr> and so on. Hence it is required to use additional filters to exclude header and footer rows while adding UI effects on the GridView. These tips have been tried out on a GridView where paging is not enabled. When the paging is enabled, the pager however gets highlighted. We are still working on a solution to prevent the UI effects from being applied on the pager. We will update this article, once we find a solution. If you have a solution that works cross browser, please share it with us.

The link to download the code for all these samples can be found at the end of this article. Let’s see some tips.


1. Highlight an ASP.NET GridView row by clicking on it     

This tip lets you highlight a row when you click anywhere on the row. Clicking back on a highlighted row, removes the highlight.

<head id="Head1" runat="server">

<title>Highlight Row on Click</title>

<script src="Scripts/jquery-1.3.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

<script type="text/javascript">

    $(document).ready(function() {

        $("tr").filter(function() {

            return $('td', this).length && !$('table', this).length

        }).click(function() {

            $(this).toggleClass('currRow');

        });

    });

</script>

<style type="text/css">

    .currRow

    {

        background-color:Gray;

        cursor:pointer;

    }   

</style>

</head>

After applying the filter on the rows (to prevent the user from highlighting the Header and Footer row), we use the toggleClass to highlight/remove highlight on the row.

Output:

2. Remove/Hide the Highlighted rows of an ASP.NET GridView

If you want to remove/hide the highlighted rows from the GridView, then here’s how to do so. We have added a HTML button control (Button1) to the form

<input id="Button1" type="button" value="Remove Rows" />

The jQuery is as shown below:

<head id="Head1" runat="server">

    <title>Hide Highlighted Rows>/title>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.3.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">

        $(document).ready(function() {

            $("tr").filter(function() {

                return $('td', this).length && !$('table', this).length

            }).click(function() {

                $(this).toggleClass('currRow');

            });

            $("#Button1").click(function() {               

                var hideRows = $("tr").hasClass("currRow");

                if (hideRows == true) {                   

                    $("tr.currRow").remove();

                }

            });

        });

    </script>

    <style type="text/css">

        .currRow

        {

            background-color:Gray;

            cursor:pointer;

        }   

    </style>

</head>

Here the user first highlights the rows and then clicks on the ‘Remove Rows’ button to remove the highlighted rows

3. Remove/Hide ASP.NET GridView Rows on Mouse Click     

In our previous sample, we were following a two step process of first highlighting multiple rows and then removing them. Let’s say if we want to remove the rows as the user clicks on them, then follow this approach:

    <script type="text/javascript">

        $(document).ready(function() {

                $("tr").filter(function() {

                    return $('td', this).length && !$('table', this).length

                }).click(function() {

                    $(this).remove();

                });

        });       

    </script>

4. Highlight an ASP.NET GridView row on Mouse Hover     

In case you do not want to define a separate style for the row and want to highlight a row on mouse over (instead of the click), follow this tip:

<head id="Head1" runat="server">

    <title>Highlight Row on Hover</title>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.3.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">

        $(document).ready(function() {

            $("tr").filter(function() {

                return $('td', this).length && !$('table', this).length

            }).css({ background: "ffffff" }).hover(

                function() { $(this).css({ background: "#C1DAD7" }); },

                function() { $(this).css({ background: "#ffffff" }); }

                );

        });

    </script>

</head>

Output:

5. Drag and Drop Rows of an ASP.NET GridView

 

 

 

 

This tip comes very handy when you are presenting a set of data in a GridView and want to rearrange rows at runtime. We are using the Table Drag and Drop Plugin for this example and it’s as simple as calling tableDnD() on the table. This plugin enables drag/drop on a table.

<head runat="server">

    <title>Drag Drop Rows</title>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.3.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery.tablednd_0_5.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">

        $(document).ready(function() {

            $("#GridView1").tableDnD();

        });

</script>

</head>

Output:

Before Drag

After Drop - dragging row with Customer ID ‘ANATR’ below ‘BLONP’

That’s it for now. We saw some UI tips that can be applied to an ASP.NET GridView using jQuery. Stay tuned to see some more in the forthcoming articles. We are also planning to write an article to store these UI changes when the user paginates through the Grid or a postback occurs

 

 

 

 



ASP.NET MVC Hosting :: ASP.NET MVC Model Binder for Repositories

clock September 21, 2010 08:11 by author Administrator

How do you take the values posted by an HTML form and turn them into a populated domain entity? One popular technique is to bind the POST values to a view-model and then map the view-model values to an entity. Since your action method’s argument is the view-model, it allows you to decide in the controller code if the view-model is a new entity or an existing one that should be retrieved from the database. If the view-model represents a new entity you can directly create the entity from the view-model values and then call your repository in order to save it.  In the update case, you can directly call your repository to get a specific entity and then update the entity from the values in the view-model

However, this method is somewhat tedious for simple cases. Is a view-model always necessary? Wouldn’t it be simpler to have a model binder that simply created the entity for you directly? Here’s our attempt at such a binder:

public class EntityModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder, IAcceptsAttribute
{   
readonly IRepositoryResolver repositoryResolver;
    EntityBindAttribute declaringAttribute;

    public EntityModelBinder(IRepositoryResolver repositoryResolver)
    {
        this.repositoryResolver = repositoryResolver;
    }

    protected override object CreateModel(
        ControllerContext controllerContext,
        ModelBindingContext bindingContext,
        Type modelType)
    {
        if (modelType.IsEntity() && FetchFromRepository)
        {
            var id = GetIdFromValueProvider(bindingContext.ValueProvider, modelType);
            if (id != 0)
            {
                var repository = repositoryResolver.GetRepository(modelType);
                object entity;
                try
                {
                    entity = repository.GetById(id);
                }
                finally
                {
                    repositoryResolver.Release(repository);
                }
                return entity;
            }
        }

        // Fall back to default model creation if the target is not an existing entity
        return base.CreateModel(controllerContext, bindingContext,
odelType);
    }

    private static int GetIdFromValueProvider(IValueProvider valueProvider, Type modelType)
    {
        var result = valueProvider.GetValue(modelType.GetPrimaryKey().Name);
        return (result == null) ? 0 : (int)result.ConvertTo(typeof(Int32));
    }

    public override object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var model = base.BindModel(controllerContext, bindingContext);
        ValidateEntity(bindingContext, controllerContext, model);
        return model;
    }

    protected virtual void ValidateEntity(
        ModelBindingContext bindingContext,
        ControllerContext controllerContext,
        object entity)
    {
        // override to provide additional validation.
    }

    private bool FetchFromRepository
    {
        get
        {
            // by default we always fetch any model that implements IEntity
            return declaringAttribute == null ? true :
declaringAttribute.Fetch;
        }
    }

    public virtual void Accept(Attribute attribute)
    {
        declaringAttribute = (EntityBindAttribute)attribute;   
    }

    // For unit tests

    public void SetModelBinderDictionary(ModelBinderDictionary modelBinderDictionary)
    {
        Binders = modelBinderDictionary;
    }
}


We have simply inherited ASP.NET MVC’s DefaultModelBinder and overriden the CreateModel method. This allows us to check if the type being bound is one of our entities and then grabs its repository and gets it from the database if it is.

Now, We are most definitely not doing correct Domain Driven Development here despite our use of terms like ‘entity’ and ‘repository’. It’s generally frowned on to have table-row like settable properties and generic repositories. If you want to do DDD, you are much better off only binding view-models to your views

 



Web Deployment with Visual Studio 2010 and IIS7

clock September 6, 2010 11:03 by author Administrator

Today, deploying a web application is not as easy as it should be. Whether you are deploying your web to a shared hosting environment and paying monthly to maintain it OR whether you have a web server/s managed by your enterprise, there are a lot of manual steps involved in getting your application from point A to point B.

If you are deploying your web application to a shared hoster then today you have to use technologies like FTP which take a long time to get your web content to the hosted server. After deploying your content you have to manually go to hoster control panel and install your database by running sql scripts and configure various IIS settings like marking a folder as an application to isolate it from the rest of the application.

If you are in an enterprise environment and you want to get a web application deployed you have to systematically document each step that your server admins and DBAs have to perform. In most circumstances you also have to ask your admins to modify the web.config files and go to IIS Manager and configure your settings apart from deploying your web content. Your DBA has to do the necessary steps of running the sql scripts in the right order to get your DB up and running. Such installations many a times take hours to complete.

With Visual Studio 2010 and IIS Web Deployment Tool (MsDeploy.exe / Web Deploy) we are introducing a set of technologies which can seamlessly deploy your applications taking care of the problems stated above. Microsoft Web Deployment Tool is a free download available on the web… You can download MSDeploy from below location:

http://blogs.iis.net/msdeploy/archive/2008/10/29/the-web-deployment-tool-beta-2-is-now-available.aspx

Do note that installing Visual Studio 2010 will automatically install MSDeploy for you. Visual Studio 2010 CTP can be downloaded from below location:

http://www.asp.net/vwd/

Web Deployment feature sets in VS 2010 can be broken down into following major areas:

1. Web Packaging - VS 2010 uses MSDeploy to create a .zip file for your application which we call as a web package. This file contains meta data + the below artifacts

· All of your IIS Settings (e.g. application pools, error pages etc)
· Web Content (e.g. .aspx, .ascx, .js, images etc)
· SQL Server DB
· Various other artifacts like Security Certs, GAC Components, Registry etc

A web package can then be taken to any server and installed either via IIS Manager UI Wizard or even via command line or API for automated deployment scenarios.

2. Web.Config Transformation – With VS 2010 web deployment we are introducing XML Document Transform (XDT) which will allow you to transform your development time web.config file to production/deployment time web.config file. The transformation is controlled by web.config TRANSFORM files named web.debug.config, web.release.config etc. The naming of these files is tied to the MSBuild configuration you are trying to deploy. The transform file will need just the changes that you really want to make to your deployed web.config… You can control the type of changes by instructing the XDT engine using simple and easy to understand syntax…

e.g. the below syntax in web.release.config will replace the connectionString section with new values in the web.config file which is produced for deployment of your release configuration.

3. DB Deployment – VS 2010 allows you to deploy your application along with all of its dependencies including database dependencies on SQL Server. Just by providing the connection string of your source database VS10 will automatically script its data/schema and package it for deployment. VS will also allow you to provide custom .sql scripts and also sequence them correctly to run on the server. Once your DB is packaged along with your IIS Settings and web content you can choose to deploy it to any server by providing the connection string at the install time.

4. 1-Click Publish - VS 2010 will allow you to not only package your web applications with all of its dependencies but also use IIS remote management service to publish the application to remote server. VS 10 will now allow you to create a publish profile of your hoster account or of various testing servers and save your credentials securely so that going forward you can deploy to any of these publish profiles with just one click using Web One Click toolbar. With VS 10 you will also be able to publish using MsBuild command line so that you can configure your team build environment to include publishing in continuous integration model

 



ASP.NET 4.0 & ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting

 

ASPHostCentral is a premier web hosting company where you will find low cost and reliable web hosting. We have supported the latest ASP.NET 4.5 hosting and ASP.NET MVC 4 hosting. We have supported the latest SQL Server 2012 Hosting and Windows Server 2012 Hosting too!

 

Calendar

<<  October 2017  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345

View posts in large calendar

Sign in