ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting & ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting BLOG

BLOG about ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting, ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting and .NET 4.5 Framework and its Capabilities

ASP.NET Hosting :: Working with ASP.NET Cookies

clock January 31, 2012 09:53 by author Administrator

 

 

Introduction

Cookies are also known by many names, HTTP Cookie, Web Cookie, Browser Cookie, Session Cookie, etc. Cookies are one of several ways to store data about web site visitors during the time when web server and browser are not connected. Common use of cookies is to remember users between visits. Practically, cookie is a small text file sent by web server and saved by web browser on client machine.

Use of Cookies?

Cookies may be used for authentication, identification of a user session, user's preferences, shopping cart contents, or anything else that can be accomplished through storing text data. Cookies can also be used for travelling of data from one page to another.

Is Cookies Secured?

Well, this question has no specific answers in YES or NO. Cookies could be stolen by hackers to gain access to a victim's web account. Even cookies are not software and they cannot be programmed like normal executable applications. Cookies cannot carry viruses and cannot install malware on the host computer. However, they can be used by spyware to track user's browsing activities.

Using Cookies

Creating/Writing Cookies

There are many ways to create cookies, I am going to outline some of them below:

Way 1 (by using HttpCookies class)
//First Way
HttpCookie StudentCookies = new HttpCookie("StudentCookies");
StudentCookies.Value = TextBox1.Text;
StudentCookies.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddHours(1);
Response.Cookies.Add(StudentCookies);

Way 2 (by using Response directly)
//Second Way
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"].Value = TextBox1.Text;
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"].Expires = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1);


Way 3 (multiple values in same cookie)
//Writing Multiple values in single cookie
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["RollNumber"] = TextBox1.Text;
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["FirstName"] = "Abhimanyu";
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["MiddleName"] = "Kumar";
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["LastName"] = "Vatsa";
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["TotalMarks"] = "499";
Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"].Expires = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1);


Reading/Getting Cookies

In the above code, I have used many ways to write or create cookies so I need to write here using all the above ways separately.

For Way 1
string roll = Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"].Value; //For First Way

For Way 2
string roll = Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"].Value;  //For Second Way

For Way 3
//For Multiple values in single cookie
string roll;
roll = Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["RollNumber"];
roll = roll + " " + Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["FirstName"];
roll = roll + " " + Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["MiddleName"];
roll = roll + " " + Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["LastName"];
roll = roll + " " + Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"]["TotalMarks"];
Label1.Text = roll;


Deleting Cookies

In the above code, I have used many ways to create or read cookies. Now look at the code given below which will delete cookies.

if (Request.Cookies["StudentCookies"] != null)
{
    Response.Cookies["StudentCookies"].Expires = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1);    Response.Redirect("Result.aspx");  //to refresh the page
}


Understanding HttpCookie Class It contains a collection of all cookie values.

We do not need to use any extra namespaces for HttpCookies class (we already have used this in Way 1 above), because this class is derived from System.Web namespaces. HttpCookies class lets us work with cookies without using Response and Request objects (we have already used this in Way 2 and Way 3 above).

HttpCookie class has a list of some properties, let us outline them.

    * Domain: It contains the domain of the cookie.
    * Expires: It contains the expiration time of the cookie.
    * HasKeys: It contains True if the cookie has subkeys.
    * Name: It contains the name of the cookie.
    * Path: It contains the virtual path to submit with the cookie.
    * Secure: It contains True if the cookie is to be passed in a secure connection only.
    * Value: It contains the value of the cookie.
    * Values:

Limitations of Cookies

There are following limitations for cookies:
   1. Size of cookies is limited to 4096 bytes.
   2. Total 20 cookies can be used on a single website; if you exceed this browser will delete older cookies.
   3. End user can stop accepting cookies by browsers, so it is recommended to check the users’ state and prompt the user to enable cookies.

Sometimes, the end user disables the cookies on browser and sometimes browser has no such feature to accept cookies. In such cases, you need to check the users’ browser at the home page of website and display the appropriate message or redirect on appropriate page having such message to enable it first. The following code will check whether the users’ browser supports cookies or not. It will also detect if it is disabled too.

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (Request.Browser.Cookies)
    {
        //supports the cookies
    }
    else
    {
        //not supports the cookies
        //redirect user on specific page
        //for this or show messages
    }
}


It is always recommended not to store sensitive information in cookies

 

 

 



ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: Html Encoded Expressions in ASP.NET 4.0

clock November 17, 2011 06:09 by author darwin

Introduction

We all know <%=expression%> features in asp.net. We can print any string on page from there. Mostly we are using them in asp.net mvc. Now we have one new features with asp.net 4.0 that we have HTML Encoded Expressions and this prevent Cross scripting attack as we are html encoding them.

ASP.NET 4.0 introduces a new expression syntax <%: expression %> which automatically convert string into html encoded. Let’s take an example for that.
I have just created an hello word protected method which will return a simple string which contains characters that needed to be HTML Encoded. Below is code for that.


protected static string HelloWorld()
{
   return "Hello World!!! returns from function()!!!>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>";
}

Now let’s use the that hello world in our page html like below. I am going to use both expression to give you exact difference.

<form id="form1" runat="server">
<div>
   <strong><%: HelloWorld()%></strong>
</div>
<div>
   <strong><%= HelloWorld()%></strong>
</div>
</form>

Now let’s run the application and you can see in browser both look similar. 



But when look into page source html in browser like below you can clearly see one is HTML Encoded and another one is not.



Cool, right?? Happy Programming.



ASP.NET Hosting :: How to Display Images with ASP.NET CheckBoxList Control

clock November 3, 2011 06:49 by author darwin

In this tips I will discuss how you can customize the rendering of ASP.NET CheckBoxList control with images.  Let’s consider a scenarios where you want to show some status images with every checkbox with in a CheckBoxList. Many developers use table with checkbox and images in different cell to display Images with checkbox.  But, we can easily achieve the same using CheckBoxList control itself.

Let’s  consider you have items in a CheckBoxList control.



If you run your web application with above CheckBoxList items, you will get below output



Now you want images instead of the text with the list of checkbox controls. If you look in to the code, as of now, nothing has been written with in NewCheckList_DataBound method.  To enable the adding icon  we have to override the content of items which is being  generating during  data bound. Below is a simple code which will enable to add  icons for every CheckBo  item in the CheckBoxList



What we did is just iterating through each element and override the  item text as per our requirement . Once run, you will get the output as below.



If you want avoid the text, you just need change the override content of item.Text.



So not only the icon, you can add any HTML Content as per requirement.



ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting :: The Reasons Application Pool Recycle

clock October 31, 2011 07:43 by author Administrator

If your ASP.NET application crashes, has an unhandled exception, hangs or otherwise becomes brain-dead, it will cause the application pool to recycle. Sometimes your application pool recycles for no obvious reason. This is usually a configuration issue or it may be caused by your app performing file system operations in the application directory. Many times developers incorrectly set up SqlConnections so that they aren't properly closed and returned to the connection pool, and this can also cause your AppPool to recycle unexpectedly. When your AppPool recycles, you can kiss your InProc Sessions - and everything else -- goodbye.

Application pool settings

Looking at the properties for the application pool in IIS, you'll see the settings for "on purpose" recycling. In IIS6 these are:

- Recycle worker processes (in minutes)
- Recycle worker process (in requests)
- Recycle worker processes at the following times
- Maximum virtual memory
- Maximum used memory

If you're running IIS5 or the IIS5 isolation mode you must look at the processModel element of machine.config. The properties you should pay attention to are:

- memoryLimit
- requestLimit
- timeout

In IIS 7.o, you have Fixed Interval or Fixed # Requests, or Specific Times for recycling. Also, there are Memory -based Maximums for Virtual and Private Memory, and additional items for Configurable and Runtime recycling events including "unhealthy ISAPI".

When an application pool recycles, HTTP.SYS holds onto the client connection in kernel mode while the user mode worker process recycles. After the process recycle, HTTP.SYS transparently routes the new requests to the new worker process. Consequently, the client never "loses all connectivity" to the server; the TCP connection is not lost -- only state is lost (Application, Session, Cache, etc.).

memoryLimit
The default value of memoryLimit is 60. This value is only useful if you have a small amount memory on a 32 bit machine. "60" means 60% of total system memory. So if you have 1 GB of memory your IIS worker process will automatically restart once it hits memory usage of 600 MB.

requestLimit
This setting is "infinite" by default, but if it is set to 8000 for example, then ASP.NET will launch a new worker process once it has handled 8000 requests.

timeout
The default timeout is "infinite". This is where you set the lifetime of the worker process. Once the timeout is reached ASP.NET launches a new worker process, so setting this to "00:30:00" would recycle your application every 30 minutes.

Other properties
Another property within the processModel element that will cause your application pool to recycle is responseDeadlockInterval. If you have a deadlock then that's your main "fix" that you need to worry about -- changing the responseDeadlockInterval setting won't do much to resolve the problem. You need to deal with the deadlock itself, find out why it's happening, and change your code.

File Change Notification

ASP.NET 2.0 depends on File Change Notifications (FCN) to see if the application has been updated, and depending on the magnitude of change the application pool will recycle. If you or your application are adding and removing directories to the application folder, then you will be restarting your application pool every time.

Altering the following files also causes an immediate restart of the application pool:
- web.config
- machine.config
- global.asax
- Any file in the /bin directory or subfolders

Updating .aspx files, etc. causing a recompile eventually triggers a restart of the application pool also. There is a property of the compilation element under system.web called numRecompilesBeforeAppRestart. The default value is 20, meaning that after 20 recompiles the application pool will recycle.

Workaround for the sub-directory issue

If your application actually requires adding and removing sub-directories you can use linkd to create what's called a directory junction:

Create a directory you'd like to exclude from FCN, e.g. c:\inetpub\wwwroot\MyWebApp\MyFolder
Create a separate folder somewhere outside the wwwroot, e.g. c:\MyExcludedFolder
Use linkd to link the two: linkd c:\inetpub\wwwroot\MyWebApp\MyFolder c:\MyExcludedFolder
Now any changes made in the c:\inetpub\wwwroot\MyWebApp\MyFolder will now actually occur in c:\MyExcludedFolder so they will not be sensed by FCN.

Linkd only comes with the Windows XX Resource Kit, which is a pretty big download. But Mark Russinovitch has "junction" which could be even better:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sysinternals/FileAndDisk/Junction.mspx  

Is recycling the application pool good or bad?


If your app is coded properly, you shouldn't have to recycle the application pool. However, if you're dealing with a memory leak in your app and you need to buy time to fix it, then recycling the application pool could be a good idea. It's important to understand, though, that's not a "Fix" - it's just a "Band-Aid" until you find out what's causing the problem and fix your code. Unlike as with ASP.NET 1.1, in ASP.NET 2.0 if your app generates an unhandled exception the AppDomain will unload causing an application pool recycle. Consequently it is extremely important to ensure that your code is "best practices" and doesn't generate unhandled exceptions except under the most extreme and unusual conditions



ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting :: SOLVING an error message: “Unrecognized attribute targetFramework”

clock September 22, 2011 07:32 by author Administrator

I recently upgraded from Visual Web Developer 2008 to Visual Web Developer 2010 and have run into an issue, I started seeing a configuration error. In two cases I had been working on web applications in Visual Web developer 2010.


Case 1 appeared after I had opened an existing application and when prompted, do I want to configure the site for use with ASP.NET 4.0, I must have said yes.

Case 2 came when I created a new application and my system is setup to use Framework ASP.NET 4.0

In both situations I got the following error <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" /> pointing to my web.config file. I like working in Visual Web Developer 2010, but my hosting server is not yet setup for .Net Framework 4.0, so I needed to find out how to down-grade from 4.0 to 3.5 framework.



The following is what I did to change the target Framework from ASP.NET 4.0 to ASP.NET 3.5.

1) Ensure IIS and the ASP.NET properties are configured for Framework 2.0. Note: Framework 3.5 will not show up in the list of installed options due to the fact that framework 3.5 is an extension of 2.0 and not a stand alone release


 2) Configure you web application to use target Framework 4.0 by right clicking your website in the solution explorer >> Property Pages >> Build >> Change "Target Framework" to .NET Framework 3.5.

T



ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: The Difference between Response.Redirect and Response.RedirectPermanent

clock September 20, 2011 07:46 by author Administrator

In ASP.NET 4.0 there are new features that enable developer to make SEO friendly websites very easily. And if you google out, you will find plenty of article which explain this feature. But I am more interested in Response.RedirectPermanent. As the name suggest it is used to redirect permanently moved resources to new location. And most of all articles on the net just explain this with some example. But how can we visualize that whether resource is redirected permanently or not. So here is the answer for that. I have used FireBug to examine the same


Whenever we redirect with Response.Redirect, we can see following activity in FireBug console



As we can see that page which issues Response.Redirect its response status code 302(Found) which means requested url(default.aspx) is found but it is temporarily moved to about.aspx. More information on HTTP status code can be found here.

Now whenever we redirect with Response.RedirectPermanent, we can see following activity in FireBug console



As we can see that page which issues Response.RedirectPermanent its response status code 301(Moved Permanently) which means requested url(default.aspx) is moved Permanently to about.aspx. 301 status code is used by search engine crawler to update search index to new moved information.

I hope information provided here would be more helpful to distinguish between Response.Redirect and Response.RedirectPermanent



ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: Main Differences of Custom Control and User Control

clock August 23, 2011 07:57 by author Administrator

If you are thinking to build a control and apply the same to more than one place, you can take two kinds of approaches. Either you can create an User control inheriting from UserControl and adding a XAML for your control or use CustomControl to write yourself. Either one of them you choose they have their own pros and cons. Here in this post I will define what are the differences between the two approaches so that you can choose either one of them based on your requirement.

Before we start lets define both the terms:

UserControl : A usercontrolis a reusable chunk of user interface that is built up as a composition of other UIElement in the same style the main UI is built. In other words, a user control is just like a normal application block that can be used as Reusable component, and can be defined both using XAML and code together. It gives you a fresh UI canvas where you can define your custom reusable component that can be used widely in the application. In WPF, UserControl acts as a base class for any reusable component, but if you are looking for inheriting some other base, you can look into this.

Limitation of UserControl :

1. Appearance of an UserControl cannot be changed using a Template. Even though it has a property for Template, but it is of no use, as you cannot change the appearance of UserControl through this property.

2. UserControl is derived from ContentControl, thus if you change the Content of an usercontrol the entire UI will be replaced with that content.

3. As UserControl has both XAML and code behind. But as XAML can be used only once for entire inheritance hierarchy, you cannot use XAML for any class that inherits from your userControl. This is actually because Application.LoadComponent loads up the XAML once and is incompatible with inheritance. Thus when loading the XAML, the IComponentConnector interface is used to hook events and fields from XAML, hence you cannot replace XAML from your base class.

Custom Control: A customcontrol is a User interface element that has a distinct behaviour. A CustomControl is just a class that has one default appearance defined in Generic.xaml style which can be replaced by Template and Style at runtime but the behaviour you define for the control remains the same. So choose a CustomControl only when you need a certain kind of behaviour which is not there with the existing controls you have.

Note: Please don’t create a new custom control just to change the UI appearance as you can do this with any control available using custom Template

Limitation :

1. You have to define each behaviour for your control using Code. So it is hard way of achieving a behaviour.

2. Generic style is needed to be defined with your custom control to ensure that your control has a default look and feel.

Hence, based on your own requirement, if you are looking for a new behaviour which is different from existing userinterfaces available with WPF, you go for a Custom Control. A customControl can be styled and templated and best suited for a situation when you are building a Control Library.

On the contrary, a UserControl gives you an easy way to define reusable chunk of XAML which can be reused widely in your application and when you don’t need to use it as a Control Library.

I hope this gives you a brief idea on the differences between the two.

Happy Coding.



ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: How to Register HTTP Module at Runtime without Editing web.config?

clock July 4, 2011 08:35 by author Administrator

The ASP.NET pipeline allows HTTP modules to be plugged-in to a request and intercept or modify each individual request. Modules can be used for processes like caching, authentication etc. However a basic requirement for an HTTP module to function, is that it must be registered in your config file. This leads to editing the Web.Config whenever you have to add/remove modules. I hate fudging with my config file too often!

Not known to many developers, ASP.NET 4.0 provides the PreApplicationStartMethodAttribute which allows you to run code even before any app_start event gets fired or any dynamic compilation occurs (App_code).

So how do I register an HTTP Module at Runtime using PreApplicationStartMethodAttribute and DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule?

It’s a simple 3 process step!

Step 1: Implement your Module. In the code shown below, we are implementing the IModule interface and subscribing to the BeginRequest event of the HttpApplication object. The OnBeginRequest method hooks up to the BeginRequest event.



Step 2: Register the Module dynamically using the DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule method. Write this code in the same class you created above



Step 3: The final step is to use the PreApplicationStartMethod attribute. Just add this  attribute at the assembly level in the AssemblyInfo file or as shown below:

There you go! You have just registered an HTTP module into the ASP.NET pipeline without making any changes to web.config file.

 

 

 

 



ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting :: Questions on .NET 4 New GAC Locations/GacUtil

clock March 25, 2011 09:22 by author Administrator

This is what I know, let me know if you know otherwise.  There are now 2 distinct GAC locations that you have to manage as of the .NET 4 Framework release.

The GAC was split into two, one for each CLR (2.0, 3.5 AND 4.0).  The CLR version used for both .NET Framework 2.0 and .NET Framework 3.5 is CLR 2.0. To avoid issues between CLR 2.0 and CLR 4.0 , the GAC is now split into private GAC’s for each runtime.  The main change is that CLR v2.0 applications now cannot see CLR v4.0 assemblies in the GAC.

In previous .NET versions, when I installed a .NET assembly into the GAC (using gacutil.exe or even drag and drop to the c:\windows\assembly directory), I could find it in the ‘C:\Windows\assembly’ path.

With .NET 4.0, GAC is now located in the 'C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\assembly’ path.

In order to install a dll to the .NET 4 GAC it is necessary to use the gacutil found C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin\GacUtil.exe  In addition, you can no longer use the drag n' drop (in reality the drag n' drop really executed the gacutil via a windows explorer extension).

After you use the gacutil.exe -i {path to dll} you can view that it is indeed in the gac via gacutil -l (which will list all dlls in the gac).  I used this command and piped the results to a text file via > out.txt which made it easier to find the recently added component.

I was not able to see my gac object in the directory for .net 4 (i.e. c:\windows\microsoft.net\assembly path).  I am not sure why just yet.  Ideas?

At this point, the object is in the local gac however if you are using vs.net 2010 it will still not show up in the list of references. To get the component to show up in the VS.NET list of references can add a registry entry to HKLM\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\Microsoft\.NETFramework\v4.0.30319\AssemblyFoldersEx  At this point, the component is in the local GAC and is in the list of references to be used by vs.net.

Note, I did find that if I just added the path to the registry without adding it to the gac it was available to vs.net.  So, because the component is listed via vs.net add references it does not necessarily mean it is in the gac.

What still confuses me is that I am still unable to view my recently added component in the .NET 4 directories above.  Ideas?



ASP.NET 4.0 Hosting :: Working with Error Logging and Error Handling in ASP.NET 4.0

clock October 22, 2010 10:01 by author Administrator

Logging exceptions is important for controlling your application when they are deployed. You can opt for using one of the available libraries on the market or your own way of storing this information. Both sides have their own pros and cons. Using a third-party code lets you implement the task in less time.

Writing your own code is probably a win situation if you do not want to include reference to gigantic libraries in order to only use a small part of their features. Handling errors the right way is crucial from the security point of view: the less your attacker sees, the more secure your application. In this article, you will learn how to protect your error from others and, at the same time, log it for tracking purposes

Error logging with Enterprise Library and log4Net

If you decide to use custom libraries to handle logs, you will probably choose between Microsoft Enterprise Library and Apache Foundation log4net. Microsoft Enterprise Library, at the time of writing, is available in version 4.1 at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc467894.aspx. This library is free and contains a lot of functionalities; logging is only a small part of it. It is diffused among enterprise applications because even though it is not part of the .NET Framework BCL, developers tend to trust external class libraries coming from Microsoft.log4net is a project from Apache Software Foundation and it is available under the Apache License at http://logging.apache.org/log4net/index.html.   

Both libraries provide great flexibility; you can log information (and errors) to a file, a database, a message queue, or the event log or just generate an e-mail.

If you are trying to choose one over the other, you have to consider these points:

- Enterprise Library has a GUI tool to configure its Logging Application Block
- log4net supports hierarchical log maintenance

The choice is based mainly on the features you need to address because, from the performance point of view, they are very similar.

Enterprise Library is often considered because of its capabilities so, if you are already using it in your project (for example, because of the Cache Application Block), you may find it very similar, and using it is the right move because you already have a dependency on the main library

On the other hand, log4net is preferred by developers searching.

only for a simple and very complete library to perform this task and nothing more

If you prefer to write code, however, and your logging needs are only related to exceptions, you'll probably find easier to just handle and store this information with your custom code


Intercepting and handling errors with a custom module


Exposing errors to end users is not a good idea from both the usability and the security point of view. Error handling implemented the right way will help the administrators to inspect the complete error and provide a courtesy page to the users.

Problem


We want to avoid full error disclosure to normal users and display the full error to the administrators. This will preserve security and help the administrators to inspect errors without accessing the error logging tool while they’re running the page causing the error. We want to provide also an entry point to add more powerful exception logging capabilities in the future

Solution


ASP.NET gives you control over errors, letting you choose from among three options:

- Always show the errors
- Never show the errors.
- Show the error only when the request is coming from the same machine running the application

The following code comes from a typical web.config and lists the options:



These settings are flexible enough to cover your needs while developing the application; the reality is that, when you put your application in production, you will probably not make requests from the same machine running the page and you need to be the only one accessing error details


It is very important to not show sensitive information to users: errors are considered very dangerous. HttpApplication has a useful Error event, used to intercept exceptions not blocked at a higher level, such as in a try/catch block. This event can be handled to combine authorization and authentication from ASP.NET so you can show the error only to a specific group of people, thanks to Roles API available on ASP.NET

The code is really simple: you just have to handle the event, verify user permissions given the current roles, and then show a personalized error page or just let ASP.NET do the magic, using the values specified in web.config

We need to configure web.config to register our module as in listing 1

Listing 1: The custom authorization module to modify the response flow



When an error occurs, the exception is handled by our event handler, and we will display an error message similar to the one in figure 1

Figure 1: Using our custom error system we can add further information to the error page or simply decide to show the error to given clients.



To implement such a personalized view, we need to write a custom HttpModule like the one in listing 2



This code can be easily adapted to integrate further logging instrumentations, like form variables or application status. To register the module, you have to place this configuration in your web.config:

Error event handler is the right place to add your code. You can use MailMessage class from System.Net.Mail to compose a notification email
and send it to your address. If you want to use something that’s readily available, take a look at Health Monitoring in the MSDN documentation.

It is important to remark that TrySkipIisCustomErrors property from HttpResponse class is used to modify the default behavior of IIS 7.x when dealing with custom errors. By default, in fact, IIS 7 will bypass the local error handling and, instead, use the configuration applied in the system.webServer section. By setting this property, you can control IIS 7.x behavior too; the behavior of IIS 6.0 is not affected by this change

Discussion

HttpModules enable global event handling and are very useful in such a situation. This approach is very simple, centralized, and open to further improvements. It is also showing you how easy it is to tweak ASP.NET behavior and to avoid security concerns: the less an attacker sees the better it is for your application security. Error logging can be done with many different approaches. What we showed in these examples is a starting point. To meet your more complex needs, you can use the libraries we mentioned

Summary

Remember that ASP.NET is built with flexibility. This characteristic reflects how many incredible things you can do using extreme techniques. ASP.NET offers the right entry points to add your own custom mechanisms to implement simple things like logging errors. ASP.NET is so powerful that you can literally do anything you may need; you just have to write code and unleash your imagination!



ASP.NET 4.0 & ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting

 

ASPHostCentral is a premier web hosting company where you will find low cost and reliable web hosting. We have supported the latest ASP.NET 4.5 hosting and ASP.NET MVC 4 hosting. We have supported the latest SQL Server 2012 Hosting and Windows Server 2012 Hosting too!

 

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